Meet Eric, Planterra’s Farmer!

Eric is Planterra’s resident “farmer”.  In the past several months he has strategically started to place edible plants in the Conservatory and throughout the grounds.  The end goal is to start implementing these yummy, locally grown ingredients in our signature cocktails and even in some dishes served at special events!

Here’s our first look at what Eric is creating – keep your eye’s peeled for updates coming soon!

Office Plants: How They Clean The Air

Through the process of photosynthesis, plants absorb light, carbon dioxide and water to manufacture sugar. The byproduct of this complex process of chemical reactions is oxygen. Even in buildings with the most advanced air filtration systems, none manufacture oxygen – the vital ingredient for healthy, breathable air.

Plants grown for interior landscaping are mostly comprised of species that are native to the understory of rainforests where there is less light and fewer breezes than in the canopy level. These plants naturally photosynthesize in lower light and have evolved to accelerate transpiration, a process that creates air movement. Transpiration circulates air and pulls airborne toxins into the leaves and roots.

In addition to oxygen, plants manufacture phytochemicals. These are natural chemicals that the plants use to protect themselves from microbes, insects and diseases. Phytochemicals suppress mold spores and bacteria in ambient air. Studies from NASA indicate that plant lled rooms contain 50 to 60 percent fewer airborne molds and bacterias than rooms without plants.

Plants That Heal: Indoor Therapeutic Gardens

CASE STUDY: HENRY FORD HOSPITAL WEST BLOOMFIELD

Nestled in 80 tranquil acres, the design of Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital was inspired by a northern Michigan lodge.  The two atriums at Henry Ford Hospital are considered to be the lungs of the facility. Combined, the atriums have approximately 2,500 live plants, installed as a design-build project by Planterra.

Features of the Atrium:

Natural Views All 300 inpatient rooms have views of nature overlooking the indoor atriums or the exterior woodlands surrounding the hospital. A Place of RefugeIsolated from the Main Atrium, the Quiet Atrium is insulated from distracting noises as a place of rest, rejuvenation and meditation. This area includes intimate seating areas and an interfaith sanctuary

Privacy Screening Plantings screen inpatient rooms which overlook the atriums. Isolated walking paths are integrated into the plan to provide for private, well-screened seating areas.

Clean Air Plants and trees with the highest toxin absorption rates were specified and planted, such varieties include the Peace Lily, Ficus and Boston Fern.

A Community Venue The Ravitz Foundation Main Atrium serves as a gathering place for patients, visitors, employees and the local community. The atrium contains an organic tea kiosk, a grand piano and ample space for events and fundraisers.

Real, Live Plants Management mandated that all plants be real to achieve the maximum healing benefits. Sanitized Plantings All plantings were grown, isolated and acclimated according to specific standards that ensure sanitation. The plants and trees are planted with a sterilized, soil-free mix. Expert Care The atriums are maintained under the supervision of senior horticultural specialists at Planterra using environmentally sound practices such as IPM management and sub-irrigation. Excellent maintenance is critical to delivering a healthy environment and long-term value.

“Plants bring nature inside the building so even in the off season times our community can still come here and be connected to nature, and really take advantage of it’s healing affects.”

-Gerard Van Grinsven, Former President and CEO, Henry Ford Hospital West Bloomfield

Indoor Plants Increase Employee Productivity

Plants in a Comp.Lab (photo credit www.wsu.edu) Pullman, Washington — A study conducted by the College of Agriculture at Washington State University (WSU) shows that live interior plants increase employee productivity and reduce stress. The study, published in the “Journal of Environmental Horticulture,” reports that productivity increased 12 percent when people performed tasks on a computer with plants, compared people who performed the same task in a room without plants.

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Productivity was measured by the response time. Professor Virginia Lohr, Ph.D of WSU said, “there was no difference in the number of errors. The big difference was the reaction time, how quickly they pressed the correct key when the plants were present.” “Plants are not just fluff,” says Dr. Lohr. “We have felt, and many people who work with plants intuitively believe, that having plants around is vital to our well-being.” For more information visit: www.wsu.edu/~lohr/

Best of HOUR Detroit

Thank you for voting us the BEST. This is the first time that we’ve received this honor from HOUR. We are absolutely delighted that the awards honor 3 of our 4 business units!

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Meet Eric, Planterra’s Farmer!

June 8th, 2015|0 Comments

Eric is Planterra’s resident “farmer”.  In the past several months he has strategically started to place edible plants in the Conservatory and throughout the grounds.  The end goal is to start implementing these yummy, locally […]

Office Plants: How They Clean The Air

June 1st, 2015|0 Comments

Through the process of photosynthesis, plants absorb light, carbon dioxide and water to manufacture sugar. The byproduct of this complex process of chemical reactions is oxygen. Even in buildings with the most advanced air filtration […]

Plants That Heal: Indoor Therapeutic Gardens

May 22nd, 2015|0 Comments

CASE STUDY: HENRY FORD HOSPITAL WEST BLOOMFIELD

Nestled in 80 tranquil acres, the design of Henry Ford West Bloomfield Hospital was inspired by a northern Michigan lodge.  The two atriums at Henry Ford Hospital are considered […]

Event Display Rentals

May 21st, 2015|0 Comments